Adobe Releases Photoshop Lightroom 5, Camera Raw 8.1 and DNG Converter 8.1

Adobe Lightroom Cover image

After two months of public beta, Adobe finally released version 5 of the popular Photoshop Lightroom image editing and workflow software. Other than a plug-in which lets you publish to Behance, there are no new features over what’s already offered in the public beta previously released.

Lightroom 5 offers a slew of useful features for photographers, including a more advanced healing/cloning tool, automatic image levelling/perspective correction as well as the ability to edit offline files. I’ve briefly played with the public beta and is quite impressed with what the perspective correction and levelling can do. Though not perfect, Lightroom 5 gets it right most of the time, needing only a few minor tweaks. This is very useful for getting your architectural shots level and rid of the “converging verticals” effect which plagues most photographs of buildings.

Also, part of the new cloning/healing brush is a “visualise spots” feature, which supposedly makes sensor dust more obvious so you can remove them. However, I can’t find a good dust-infested shot to play with this feature.

Lightroom 5 will cost US$149 for the full retail version and is available from retailers or Adobe.com. An upgrade version is available at US$79.

In other news, Adobe has also released Camera Raw 8.1 and DNG Converter 8.1. ACR 8.1 brings support for 7 new cameras, including the Olympus PEN E-P5 and E-PL5, the new Ricoh GR and Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6. It also comes with 16 more lens profiles, including that of Sigma and Zeiss’s latest offerings.

YS: Those who moaned about Creative Cloud, this might just work out for you. Manage most edits in Lightroom, then export your last version of Photoshop if you need more complex post-processing. I have yet to try out the new features, so I cannot really comment.

The time between versions feels really short though. I only just got comfortable in LR4! I hope LR5 is much faster – part of my reluctance is in Lightroom’s speed: Fast for processing, but slow for sorting and picking.

(Image Credit: Adobe Lightroom Facebook Page)

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